Author Archives: hannahpethen

About hannahpethen

Having completed my PhD in archaeology at the University of Liverpool, I am now a freelance archaeologists working with landscape and topographic survey and satellite imagery. I specialise in GIS, GPS, desk-based assessment and landscape projects and have a particular interest in Egyptian archaeology.

Ancient Ottoman and Byzantine shipwrecks discovered in pristine condition in Black Sea — Byzantine Blog

The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project has been on a mission to map out the floor of the Black Sea. The study was geared towards understanding how quickly sea levels rose at the end of the last Ice Age, some … Continue reading

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Tutankhamun, Nefertiti and all that jazz: What have we learned?

Almost a year since the media discovered Reeves’ theory that Tutankhamun’s tomb contained Nefertiti, what have we learned? Continue reading

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The Cleansing of Mosul

Originally posted on Gates of Nineveh: An Experiment in Blogging Assyriology:
As the focus has shifted to Palmyra, relatively little media attention has been paid over the past several months to ISIS’ continued destruction of cultural sites in and around…

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Review of the British Museum’s Sunken Cities Exhibition

A great exhibition, thoroughly enjoyable. Both artistic and informative. Continue reading

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The failed (Egyptian) obelisk.

The Unfinished Obelisk in the Aswan quarries was a failure as a monument, but provides valuable information on stone quarrying and obelisk carving. Continue reading

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Does the Neighbourhood Planning and Infrastructure Bill matter for archaeology outside the UK?

Changes to UK legislation will have a negative effect on attitudes to and protection of archaeology overseas? Continue reading

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The cairns of the red mountain: Cairns and comparative anthropology

Cairns are a common enough feature of the Egyptian landscape, but one I find fascinating. They are apparently ordinary and innocuous, are easy to build and hard to date, and have recently been subject to the serious archaeological research they … Continue reading

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Fakes and conspiracy theories: A cautionary tale for users of facebook archaeology pages.

This post is dedicated to all the hard-working volunteer admins who monitor facebook pages and online forums. The experiences I detail below emphasise how important your hard work is, so thank you. The internet is a marvelous thing for archaeology. … Continue reading

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Surveying in the Mansion of Gold; The Hatnub travertine (Egyptian Alabaster) quarries near Minya

The Hatnub travertine quarries comprise an area of the Eastern desert of Egypt, roughly 17km south-east of the famous site of Amarna. Since 2012 a joint mission from the Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale and the University of Liverpool have been working … Continue reading

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When diorite is gneiss; Products of the Gebel el-Asr quarries

Gebel el-Asr does not appear to be a typical Egyptian archaeological site. There are no pyramids (not even small mudbrick ones), no temples and no large structures. You could easily drive past it without noticing, but you will certainly have … Continue reading

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